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Gay Marriage

Elisha Fields

Elisha Fields

In the news recently, there has been much discussion about gay marriage. David Cameron has again pledged his support for gay marriage; still though there are many MPs and others who disagree with legalising gay marriage. As Valentine’s Day is coming up, I also thought it would be appropriate to write about the issue.

I don’t see why two consenting adults who love each other should be denied the right to marry. By denying the right for same sex couples to marry, this is inequality and excluding gay couples from mainstream society. A same sex couple should have the same rights to celebrate their love for each other just as an opposite sex couple are able to. I believe that when same sex marriage is legalised, there will be less discrimination, and reduced prejudice attitudes in society.

Although there are civil partnerships, this is not the same as marriage. Civil partnerships do have the same benefits as marriage but still they are referred to by different names. Marriage is worldly recognisable, but civil partnerships are not. By having two separate names, civil partnership and marriage, it is as if they have different identities. This could be seen to imply that gay partnerships are not as equal as straight partnerships and that the relationships are different, inferior, and not as authentic. There is still a large amount of homophobia in society from bullying in schools to discriminating from B&Bs to people being harassed in the streets to being killed. By having gay marriage, I feel that we are working towards eradicating homophobic attitudes about gay people and relationships. I think the UK need to join the lead in this.

Same sex marriage does not harm or affect anyone – it’s wrong to dictate who consenting adults should marry – what has it got to do with anyone else? Everyone knows you can’t help who you fall in love with or who you’re attracted to, now imagine this being condemned. Can you imagine if opposite sex marriage was not legalised – how would people feel if they couldn’t marry the ones they love? Isn’t it like someone dictating how you should live your life? This is another example of restriction on a freedom that should be lifted and I believe we should be working towards liberty. Wouldn’t it be nice to live in a word where we could go along and do what we please (as long as it didn’t harm anyone)? But that’s another essay.

Gay marriage also emphasises family values and stability. Additionally there are thousands of children in the UK and elsewhere that are in need of a home and a family. By legalising gay marriage, I believe that this will open the door to more opportunities for children to be adopted. Gay couples should not be denied the right to have a family; they should not be treated differently to straight couples.

Many gay people are religious, and it could be seen as a restriction on the freedom to express their religion by disallowing gay marriage. I’ve also heard the argument that marriage is about raising children – but not all straight couples have children and they’re still allowed to marry.

I feel that in years to come, when same sex couples are not discriminated against and there is full equality in society, people will look back and be astonished at the discrimination that has taken place much in the same way as how we look back now, for example, and can’t believe how women were once not allowed to vote. I support gay marriage, and I hope after reading this, you support it even more. There’s so much hatred in the world, and there should be more love! One love!

 

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